MREA establishes ground-breaking alliance with OSHA

MREA establishes ground-breaking alliance with OSHA

Industry & Technical, Safety & Training
[caption id="attachment_1877" align="alignright" width="375"] MREA President Henry Dykema (left) and OSHA Area Director Art Hazen (right) signing the Alliance agreement documents[/caption] The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has two programs that proactively engage contractors working in industries across the country. One is the Cooperative Partnership program, and the other is the Alliance program. The Montana Renewable Energy Association (MREA) was the first renewable energy group in the country to join OSHA’s partnership program. We worked together with OSHA to identify hazards specific to the renewable energy industry, discuss what trainings would be useful to the industry, and how industry members could provide input to OSHA. In return, OSHA worked to share informational resources with the industry, including training and education opportunities. MREA has now transitioned…
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What do these solar tariffs mean?

Industry & Technical, Policy & Advocacy
Last week the President ordered 30% tariffs on imported solar cells and modules. These tariffs are nothing short of artificial price increases, leaving many in Montana to wonder how this will affect their ability to purchase solar. This will be a surmountable, albeit frustrating, speed bump on the road towards energy independence. ​The decision, touted as a way to bolster american manufacturing and create jobs, is projected instead to cost the american solar industry 23,000 jobs. Most of these will be in installation, which makes up the majority of the solar industry. In Montana, installation makes up approximately 80% of the solar industry. These are small businesses, hiring a local workforce, and providing well paying jobs. Already, the uncertainty over the tariffs has caused businesses to curtail expansion. The tariffs…
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Solar Tariffs threaten Montana’s Solar Industry

Industry & Technical, Policy & Advocacy
In May, two foreign-owned U.S. solar manufacturers (Suniva and SolarWorld) filed a “Section 201” request with the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) to place tariffs on imported solar cells and modules. The petition claimed that imported solar cells and modules were harming the domestic manufacturing industry. The USITC took up the petition and began looking into whether or not these imported cells and modules were indeed doing harm. On September 22nd, the USITC ruled that an increased volume of solar imports did injure domestic solar manufacturing. This is significant because a confirmation of injury to the market requires the USITC to then make remedy recommendations to the President who will decide what, if any, remedies to enact. The original tariffs requested by the domestic manufacturers could double the cost of…
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